Projects

Projects can be efficiently built and further developed on the solid foundation of research, organization and infrastructure at KIT. Recent successes are proof of creativity and performance.

2020

THERAPEUTIC SUCCESS THROUGH A COMPUTER-BASED HEART

The KIT Institute of Biomedical Engineering is using mathematical equations to develop a computer-based heart model for the targeted treatment of cardiac arrhythmias, thus improving medical research and the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic procedures.

In Germany, about 1.8 million people suffer from atrial fibrillation – the most common type of cardiac arrhythmia. Although atrial fibrillation is not immediately life-threatening, it is associated with an increased risk of stroke. Today, it is treated with medication or catheter ablation, where a catheter is inserted into the heart and the tissue causing the disease is heated to scar it and render it non-functional. Ablation helps about three quarters of all patients to recover, but is unsuccessful for the rest.

LEARN MORE

CLIMATE-NEUTRAL HYDROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS AND BIOGAS

With methane pyrolysis in a liquid metal bubble column reactor, KIT scientists and the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) in Potsdam have developed a process to use fossil natural gas in a sustainable and climate-friendly way in the future.

After the end of the coal era, natural gas in particular has established itself as the most climate-friendly fossil alternative, since it releases only about half the carbon dioxide (CO2) per kWh compared to coal when burned or converted into electricity. However, natural gas can even be used completely without releasing CO2 through the use of innovative technologies. Ideally, no carbon dioxide should be produced at all and the carbon should be captured before combustion or other use. Such an innovative process is being researched at KIT.

LEARN MORE

COUNTERACTING CLIMATE CHANGE WITH TANDEM SOLAR CELLS

Researchers of the Institute of Microstructure Technology and the Light Technology Institute at KIT develop highly efficient solar cells by combining silicon solar cells with perovskite thin-film solar cells in a high-performance tandem solar cell.

At first glance, a tandem may seem bulky and unwieldy. At second glance, it offers a decisive advantage over an ordinary bicycle: it runs better together! Due to the double occupation, more power is available to significantly increase the drive of the bike and to cover further distances.

LEARN MORE

2019

CLOUDY WITH PROSPECT TO TRANSFER

Ph. D. Ottmar Moehler is on the trail of ice-nucleating particles in the air that promote precipitation formation. Together with industry and research partners, he has developed the mobile cloud chamber PINE for long-term measurements of such particles.

When looking at the sky, cloud formations are constantly changing: Cirrus, cumulus or even nimbostratus are just some of the cloud images – fascinating and transient at the same time.

LEARN MORE

MAKING THE INVISIBLE VISIBLE

Christian Kunz, Jun.-Prof. Franziska Mathis-Ullrich and Prof. Bjoern Hein want to make brain surgery safer. In the HoloMed project, they are working on an augmented reality system that offers surgeons context-sensitive support in the future.

Finding your way around a big city without a navigation system – in times of digitalization, that's almost inconceivable.

LEARN MORE

2018

BATCH SIZE 1 IN THE INTEREST OF THE PATIENT

Prof. Juergen Fleischer and Joerg Dittus realize additive manufacturing of fiber-reinforced plastics with continuous fibers with ARBURG. The new production technology could facilitate the custom manufacture of prostheses in the future.

The first attempts to replace missing body parts with components from outside the body and thus maintain functionality were made by the Etruscans in ancient times. They fixed lost teeth with gold wires to bridge disruptive gaps between teeth.

LEARN MORE

SMART BUILDINGS – SATISFIED USERS

In the ValMoNul project, scientists from KIT want to harmonize the automation of buildings with the individual needs of their users.

Vehicles park themselves and the refrigerator automatically orders food supplies – the Internet of Things is increasingly finding its way into our lives. Even functional buildings such as office complexes, production halls or hospitals are increasingly being shaped by digitalization and converted into so-called smart buildings.

LEARN MORE

2017

LICENSE TO DRIVE

How Prof. Jivka Ovtcharova and her research team are taking driving simulation to the next level in a technology transfer project with Chinese partners.

"Practice makes perfect". This applies, for example, to the driving practice of novice drivers. Traffic in large cities with potential traffic chaos, especially during rush hour, can put many learners under great pressure and lead to driving errors. "Dry runs" in a driving simulator can help to make the first driving attempts without pressure. Chinese driving schools are ahead of the times: to obtain a driving license, virtual driving lessons in a simulator are compulsory in addition to practical driving lessons.

LEARN MORE

GUARANTEED FREE OF GIDDINESS

KIT and ZEISS declare war on product piracy. Printed, fluorescent 3D microstructures offer increased protection against counterfeiting.

Leather goods, artwork, jewelry – there is hardly any area in which product counterfeiting has not become commonplace. In 2017, German customs removed 3,295,600 counterfeit items worth 196 million euros from circulation.

LEARN MORE

2016

ANTI-AGING ON THE CONSTRUCTION SITE

Scientists around Prof. Andreas Gerdes are working together with industry partners to decelerate the aging process of technical infrastructure and extend the life of new construction projects.

Pothole-ridden roads, dilapidated buildings, bridges in danger of collapsing, outdated rails or leaking supply lines – all these examples are obvious signs that constructed infrastructure only has a limited useful life.

LEARN MORE

A THOUSAND AND ONE IDEAS

How Prof. Ute Schepers uses biochemical research as the basis for application-oriented product ideas.

1001 nights Scheherazade told the well-known stories of Aladdin, Sinbad and other adventures. She thus stands for cleverness and the will to change the course of history with the power of the mind. The creative spirit of the fairy tale character and her helpers is extraordinary – but what connects Scheherazade with science at KIT?

LEARN MORE

2015

GUARANTEED ENERGY REDUCTION

How Heike Schuchmann and Marc Schlender want to reduce investment and operating costs in the milk processing industry.

They call it the "Milky Way of the world." The Al-Safi dairy farm is located 100 kilometers southeast of the Saudi capital Riyadh, in the middle of the desert. By far the largest dairy in the world, it is home to around 50,000 dairy cows.

LEARN MORE

PROTEINS IN THE WASH

How Mathias Franzreb and Andritz AG want to change the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries with swirling magnetic particles.

When the washing machine starts running at home, dirt particles are separated from textile fibers and are rinsed out. Proteins are not dirty laundry, but they are comparable in the simplest sense: To extract them for drug development and many other applications, they must be separated from a mixture of widely varying molecules.

LEARN MORE

2014

ALLERGIES ON PLASTICS

How Michael Hirtz and Sylwia Sekula-Neuner, together with EUROIMMUN, want to bring about better times for allergy sufferers.

A total of around 20 million Germans are said to suffer from allergic reactions. At the doctor's office, patients are examined with simple but unpleasant tests if they are suspected: For example, an allergen is dripped onto the skin and it is lightly pricked.

LEARN MORE

ON THEIR OWN INITIATIVE

How Marcel Ph. Mayer and Michael Frey want to revolutionize steering assistance systems on vehicles.

It could be an extremely comfortable situation: You get into your car, press a few buttons, and then sit back and relax with a newspaper in your hand. The car then drives itself to its destination without any intervention from the vehicle's occupants. This is called "autonomous driving". Is this a vision of the future or will it soon become reality?

LEARN MORE

2013

THE IMPULSE TRIATHLON

How industrial companies, scientific institutes and students work together to develop product innovations.

Thomas, Diego and Daniel spend most of their time in a small room of the Institute for Product Development at KIT. The three students are working on a secret project. For four months, they are researching market gaps, finding product ideas, testing what is feasible and building a prototype in record time.

LEARN MORE

QUANTUM LEAP IN MASS TRANSPORT

How Peter Gratzfeld is working on a new generation of local public transport.

They transport millions of people every day, are indispensable mobility of the masses and shape cityscapes all over the world. They squeal and rumble through and under our roads, causing traffic jams and construction work and obstruct the view of many tourist attractions: streetcars, buses and subways are an essential part of public transportation, but they are also often annoyingly loud, high-maintenance and energy-hungry.

LEARN MORE

WHERE THE CURRENTS FLOW QUIETLY

How Iris Pantle, Balazs Pritz and Carlos Falquez want to rid the world of unnecessary noise.

Noise is annoying! It's not for nothing that the term noise comes from the word alarm. Annoying noises have a subconscious effect. Even if people are used to them, they have a subconscious effect on the body and psyche. A high acoustic stress is recognized as harmful to health.

LEARN MORE

2012

THE PHORSPHORUS PHILOSOPHY

How Rainer Schuhmann and Anke Ehbrecht recover an indispensable finite resource.

What do milk, wine and sausage have in common with fertilizer and sewage sludge? Among other things, they have one thing in common: phosphorus. The chemical element P is a finite resource, comparable to mineral oil. If it runs out, the consequences could be even worse compared to oil wells drying up.

LEARN MORE

IN SIENTIA VERITAS

How Alexandra Matzke and Matthias Klaften, founders of KIT, want to help patients with pancreatic cancer.

Wine science is a science in itself. But other disciplines have something in common with making really good wine – it takes time, patience and know-how. Two former employees of KIT have combined these three qualities with each other: Willingness to take risks. As founders of the young company amcure, Alexandra Matzke and Matthias Klaften have a pharmacological hope in their hands.

LEARN MORE

Almost 500 years ago, the physician Paracelsus formulated a medical principle that still applies today: "All things are poison and nothing is without poison; the dose alone makes a thing not a poison." Particulate matter has an impact on human health, which has led to legal limits. However, these fine dust limit values only refer to the concentration of fine dust, which alone does not provide any information about the toxic load. Ph. D. Hanns-Rudolf Paur and Sonja Muelhopt, scientists at KIT, are developing systems that measure finer particles.

LEARN MORE

2011

SUPERORGANISM AS ASSISTANTS

The word 'swarm intelligence' has an important double meaning to Prof. Kai Furmans: On the one hand, he and his team are developing intelligent logistics modules that work cooperatively along the lines of a swarm of bees. On the other hand, he is working with a 'swarm' of entrepreneurs and scientists to make these logistics modules from KIT become the future concept of warehouses, factories and consumers. Both work on the basis of optimized teamwork.

LEARN MORE

THE WHAT-IF-SOFTWARE MACHINE

What if engineers were building a bridge without calculating its structural analysis first? What if the walls of a high-rise building were suddenly too small to hold up the roof?
Why don't we have to ask ourselves such questions? Because Bridges and other structures are not built on a trial-and-error basis. Before they are built, experts draw plans and calculate statics. Load tests are calculated in the computer before a single brick is laid.

LEARN MORE

THE EFFORT IN FOOD

Fruit gums, lemonade, granola bars, ketchup and packet soups taste completely different, but they have a lot in common. Some food components, such as starches or sweeteners, are found in completely different foods.
The international company Cargill produces such basic materials for a large number of companies in the food industry. Together with KIT, Cargill is developing a plant that will make the production of some of these basic materials leaner, more energy-efficient and continuous.

LEARN MORE

Diese Seite nutzt Website-Tracking-Technologien von Dritten, um ihre Dienste anzubieten. Ich bin damit einverstanden und kann meine Einwilligung jederzeit mit Wirkung für die Zukunft widerrufen oder ändern.

Einstellungen AkzeptierenImpressumDatenschutz